Showing posts with label Vintage art. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Vintage art. Show all posts

Free Printable Vintage Illustration for Mixed-Media Collage, Journaling, Papercrafts or Wall Art: Conversation in a Café, 1893

Each friend represents a world in us,
a world possibly not born until they arrive,
and it is only by this meeting that a new world is born.
Anais Nin

How many slams in an old screen door? Depends how loud you shut it.
How many slices in a bread? Depends how thin you cut it.
How much good inside a day? Depends how good you live 'em.
How much love inside a friend? Depends how much you give 'em.
Shel Silverstein

Antique illustration of two Victorian ladies enjoying a meal and warm conversation in a Parisian café. Image was originally published in 1893 and was captioned "Entre Amies" (With Friends).

Free to download for use in mixed-media collage, journaling, and various papercrafts projects or simply print and frame as wall art. You can find the high-res 8" x 10" @ 300 ppi JPEG without a watermark here.

Creative Commons License
All digitized work by The Real Victorian is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License. Please link back to RealVictorian.com as your source when sharing or publishing.

Free Printable Vintage Illustration for Mixed-Media Collage, Journaling, Papercrafts or Wall Art: A Stitch in Time Saves Nine, 1866

If you choose to not deal with an issue,
then you give up your right of control over the issue
and it will select the path of least resistance.
Susan Del Gatto

The sooner a problem is recognized and acted upon
– the less damage there is.
Mozammel Khan

Antique engraving from an 1866 issue of Peterson's Magazine. This vintage illustration shows a Victorian mother tenderly coaching her daughter in repairing a torn skirt.The original caption that appeared with the picture was "A Stitch in Time Saves Nine."

Free to download for use in mixed-media collage, journaling, and various papercrafts projects or simply print and frame as wall art. You can find the high-res 6" x 8" @ 300 ppi JPEG without a watermark here.

Creative Commons License
All digitized work by The Real Victorian is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License. Please link back to RealVictorian.com as your source when sharing or publishing.

Free Printable Vintage Art: The Daughters of Our Empire. England: The Primrose by Edwin Long

The Daughters of Our Empire. England: The Primrose, 1887
by Edwin Long (1829–1891)

Different from all other essences in the world the smell
of primroses has a sweetness that is faint and tremulous,
and yet possesses a sort of tragic intensity.
There exists in this flower, its soft petals, its cool, crinkled leaves,
its pinkish stalk that breaks at a touch, something which seems able to pour
its whole self into the scent it flings on the air.
Other flowers have petals that are fragrant. The primrose has something more than that.
The primrose throws its very life into this essence of itself
which travels upon the air.
John Cowper Powys, A Glastonbury Romance

Sources:
[1] Original image from Wikimedia Commons
[2] A short description of the painting and the model (American heiress Jennie Jerome,
mother of prime minister Sir Winston Churchill) by Yale Center for British Art
[3] A short article of the artist Edwin Long
[4] The Real Victorian's enhanced version of the painting (seen above),
downloadable as a 6" x 9" @ 300 ppi JPEG

Creative Commons Licence
Digitally enhanced reproductions of public domain paintings are shared under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.

Free Printable Vintage Art: Sweetpeas by George Dunlop Leslie

Sweetpeas, 19th century
by George Dunlop Leslie (1835–1921)

I wandered everywhere, through cities and countries wide.
And everywhere I went, the world was on my side.
Roman Payne, Rooftop Soliloquy

Sources:
[1] Original image from Wikimedia Commons
[2] A short article on the artist, George Dunlop Leslie
[3] The Real Victorian's enhanced version of the painting (seen above),
downloadable as a 4" x 5" @ 300 ppi JPEG

Creative Commons Licence
Digitally enhanced reproductions of public domain paintings are shared under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.

Vintage Art Appreciation: The Ferry by Emanuel Phillips Fox

The Ferry, c1910
by Emanuel Phillips Fox (1865–1915)

About the artist: Emanuel Phillips Fox was an Australian impressionist painter. He was born on 12 March 1865 to the photographer Alexander Fox and Rosetta Phillips at 12 Victoria Parade in Fitzroy, Melbourne, into a family of lawyers whose firm, DLA Piper New Zealand still exists. He studied art at the National Gallery of Victoria Art School in Melbourne from 1878 until 1886 under G. F. Folingsby; his fellow students included John Longstaff, Frederick McCubbin, David Davies and Rupert Bunny.

In 1886, he travelled to Paris and enrolled at the Académie Julian, where he gained first prize in his year for design, and École des Beaux-Arts (1887–1890), where his masters included William-Adolphe Bouguereau and Jean-Léon Gérôme, both among the most famous artists of the time. While at the Beaux Arts, he was awarded a first prize for painting. He was greatly influenced by the fashionable school of en plein air Impressionism.

About the painting:'The ferry' is the artist’s masterpiece. It was developed from rapid sketches that Fox painted outdoors at Trouville, a favourite beach resort in the north of France, and was completed in his Paris studio the following winter. Fox positions the viewer as if peering down to the elegant boating party and immerses us in a sumptuous, genteel world of vibrant colours, luscious fabric textures and warm summer atmosphere.

Originally exhibited in Paris and London, 'The ferry' also influenced a younger generation of Australian modernist artists when it was exhibited in Sydney in 1913.

Sources:
[1] Original image from Google Art Project
[2] Artist description
[3] Painting description

Vintage Art Appreciation: Paris - The Flower Market on the Île de la Cité by Louis Marie de Schryver

The Flower Market on the Île de la Cité
by Louis Marie de Schryver (1862–1942)

About the artist: Louis Marie de Schryver was born in Paris on October 12, 1862. The son of a well-respected journalist, he was raised in the privileged upper class of French society.As a member of the upper class himself, de Schryver was no doubt innately familiar with the leisure activities of the fashionable women of Paris that would become his subject matter. Among the many changes to daily life in the waning years of the 19th century was the increasing visibility of women outside the home.

About the painting: Both the chic women strolling the boulevards to show off their modish new dresses and hats and the young women selling flowers and staffing the cafés and boutiques in the fashionable areas of town were taking advantage of new freedoms that would not have been available to them even a generation before.

The profusion of different flowers on offer is complimented by the artist’s skillful rendering of the backlit pink parasol of the woman in the background and the play of light on the layered light-yellow ribbons on the hat of the woman in the foreground, as these elements echo the shape and color palette of the flowers themselves. The horse-drawn carriage passing in the background gives the painting a charmingly anecdotal, observed quality which is a hallmark of the artist’s best work.

Source of image and description: Christie's

Free Printable Vintage Illustration for Mixed-Media Collage, Journaling, Papercrafts or Wall Art: The First Step, 1866

If you are loath to take the first step, you will never get anywhere.
Tomáš Gavlas, Karlaz: The Way of Freedom

To move forward, one must take the first step.
Chase S.M. Neill

A black and white engraving from an 1866 issue of Peterson's Magazine. This antique illustration shows a Victorian toddler taking his first step, arms outstretched towards his mother, with a little push from his grandmother (or nurse?).The original caption that appeared with the picture was "The First Step."

Free to download for use in mixed-media collage, journaling, and various papercrafts projects or simply print and frame as wall art. You can find the high-res 10" x 8" @ 300 ppi JPEG without a watermark here.

Creative Commons License
All digitized work by The Real Victorian is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License. Please link back to RealVictorian.com as your source when sharing or publishing.

Free Printable Vintage Illustration for Mixed-Media Collage, Journaling, Papercrafts or Wall Art: Victorian Children Playing Blind Man's Buff, 1875

The best way to find yourself is to lose yourself in the service of others.
Mahatma Gandhi

A black and white engraving from an 1875 issue of Frank Leslie's Lady's Magazine in my personal collection. This antique illustration shows a group of five Victorian children playing Blind Man's Buff.

Blind man's buff or blind man's bluff is a variant of tag in which the player who is "It" is blindfolded. The traditional name of the game is "blind man's buff," where the word buff is used in its older sense of a small push. A version of the game was played in ancient Greece where it was called "copper mosquito." The game was played in the Tudor period, as there are references to its recreation by Henry VIII's courtiers. It was also a popular parlor game in the Victorian era. The poet Robert Herrick mentions it, along with sundry related pastimes, in his 1624 poem "A New Yeares Gift Sent to Sir Simeon Steward":
That tells of Winters Tales and Mirth,
That Milk-Maids make about the hearth,
Of Christmas sports, the Wassell-boule,
That tost up, after Fox-i' th' hole:
Of Blind-man-buffe, and of the care
That young men have to shooe the Mare
Source: Wikimedia

The illustration is free to download for use in mixed-media collage, journaling, and various papercrafts projects or simply print and frame as wall art. You can find the high-res 11" x 8.5" @ 300 ppi JPEG without a watermark here.

Creative Commons License
All digitized work by The Real Victorian is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License. Please link back to RealVictorian.com as your source when sharing or publishing.

Free Printable Vintage Illustration for Mixed-Media Collage, Journaling, Papercrafts or Wall Art: In the Park, 1897

It is an absolute human certainty that no one can know his own beauty
or perceive a sense of his own worth until it has been reflected back to him
in the mirror of another loving, caring human being.
John Joseph Powell, The Secret of Staying in Love

A black and white engraving from an 1897 issue of Girl's Own Paper. This antique illustration shows a large group of Victorian women riding their bicycles on a cold, wintry day in the park, with snow on the ground. The ladies seem to be having a merry old time despite the chilly weather.

Free to download for use in mixed-media collage, journaling, and various papercrafts projects or simply print and frame as wall art. You can find the high-res 6" x 8" @ 300 ppi JPEG without a watermark here.

Creative Commons License
All digitized work by The Real Victorian is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License. Please link back to RealVictorian.com as your source when sharing or publishing.

Free Printable Vintage Illustration for Mixed-Media Collage, Journaling, Papercrafts or Wall Art: The Message, 1893

Much unhappiness has come into the world because of bewilderment and things left unsaid.
Fyodor Dostoevsky

A black and white engraving from the November 19, 1893 issue of La Famille. This antique illustration shows a Victorian lady starting to write a message in a frosted-over window with her right index finger. The original caption for the image simply says: "The..."

Free to download for use in mixed-media collage, journaling, and various papercrafts projects or simply print and frame as wall art. You can find the high-res 8" x 11" @ 300 ppi JPEG without a watermark here.

Creative Commons License
All digitized work by Victorian Prints is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License. Please link back to VictorianPrints.ca as your source when sharing or publishing.

Free Printable Vintage Illustration for Altered Art, Graphic Design, Papercrafts or Scrapbooking: The Knitter, 1893

It isn't what you have or who you are or where you are or what you are doing that makes you happy or unhappy. It is what you think about it.
Dale Carnegie

A black and white engraving from the cover of the November 19, 1893 issue of La Famille. This antique illustration shows a lady sitting by a sunny window, cooled by a refreshing breeze as she knits away in serene contentment.

Download and use in various altered art, graphic design, papercrafts, scrapbooking or wall art projects. You can find the free high-res 8.5" x 11" @ 300 ppi JPEG without a watermark here.

Creative Commons License
All digitized work by Victorian Prints is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License. Please link back to VictorianPrints.ca as your source when sharing or publishing.